Real Spotify Promotion for Artists in 2019

The world of music is, perhaps, one of the industries that has best adapted to the challenges of the digital age; and with the advent of platforms like Spotify, it has become easier than ever for aspiring and established musicians alike to offer their fans a slick, convenient, and wholly legal means of access their work via a digital platform.

In other words, if you’re doing any variety of work as a musical artist, you’ve almost certainly encountered Spotify in some capacity or other. In fact, if you’ve any interest in reaching a widespread audience, it’s probably your main platform – if you’re to be widely listened to, you need to be on the platforms that the digital generation listen through.

But as you’ve almost certainly already realised, the price of using the popular platform is increased competition. Fail to get your Spotify work noticed, and it might as well not be on there – it’s going to be lost in the sea of competition, which is only growing bigger by the day.

Putting it simply, as an artist on Spotify, proper promotion is an absolute necessity on your path to success. Which is why, below, we’ve gathered just a few pointers for getting your tracks some traction on the world’s leading music streaming platform.

(Although, before you start, we’d recommend that you ensure that your profile is properly verified through Spotify For Artists).

1.      Make use of Facebook

Another thing you’re likely well aware of is that Spotify is closely linked to another major mainstream website – Facebook.

And, well, while Facebook, thanks to its widespread reach, makes for a great advertising platform for almost anything, its direct link to Spotify makes it an especially effective option for getting your music out there, especially if you’ve taken the time to ensure that your corresponding Facebook page has followers who match up well with the intended demographic of your music.

And while simple Facebook posts – announcements of your new releases, previews of upcoming ones, or just posts showing your appreciation for the fans – are all well and good, paid ads, as ever, can be even better. Especially considering, thanks to the connection between the two networks, you can target ads specifically at users who already have Spotify accounts, just to narrow your targets down even more precisely.

2.      Proper playlists

Playlists are, in many ways, one of the most effective tools of promotion when it comes to Spotify.

And we’re not talking simply about making a playlist of your own music. That’s like putting up advertising posters for your business in your own house.

No, what we mean is adding your music to playlists dominated by other people’s music. It should be playlists that suit your music, of course – playlists composed of styles, genres, and the like, that your music flows into well. But placing your own music alongside other tracks is a highly effective means of promotion for one simple reason: while people are generally open to discovering new artists, they will, fort the most part, generally prefer to stick to styles and artists who they’re already familiar with and who they know they like.

In other words, potential fans aren’t very likely to click on a playlists consisting entirely of work from someone they’ve never heard of; but if they happen to come across your tracks in a playlist of music that they already have an established connection with, there’s a fair chance they’ll decide that they like this newfound stuff. And when you take the time to ensure that you’re putting your work on some of the hotter, trendier playlists, it can really get the numbers up.

Don’t spam, of course – stuffing your tracks into every other hot playlist is no way to get your name out there. Choose playlists carefully – ensure that they’re the sort of lists whose listeners will consider your tracks a welcome new undiscovered number, rather than an out-of-place nuisance. Reach out to other artists with similar styles (and, thus, similar fans) to you, and inquire about assisting each other with promotion by featuring each other’s songs on each other’s playlists. Struggling artists need to help each other, after all – cutthroat competitiveness is for the executives.

If you really want to be sure that you’re making proper use of the promotional possibilities that Spotify playlists offer, you should consider hiring external help. Companies like Pitch Playlist specialise in finding playlists that strongly suit the specific style and genre of your work and are most likely to bring your music to a wider audience.

3.      Promote the platform

As wildly popular as Spotify may be, there are, somehow or other, music fans out there that still don’t use it.

And chances are that some of your own existing fans are among them. Maybe they listen to your music on YouTube; maybe on iTunes; or maybe they even buy physical copies of it. And that’s all well and good; but for many musical artists, Spotify is their central platform, and their main means of attaining truly widespread popularity. And the best means of ensuring this happens is concentrating the platform through which fans consume their work.

For that reason, it’s a good idea to encourage your existing fans to start enjoying your music through Spotify.

Reach out to non-Spotify fans through your social media presences. Present them with reasons to make Spotify their main platform for listening to your music. Make mention of plans to release new content exclusively through Spotify, or tell them of the reasons that you enjoy using Spotify over other streaming services. When your numbers are concentrated in one place, it becomes much easier, for both you and others, to quantify just how well you’re doing as an artist.

4.      Take promotion beyond Spotify

Yeah, this sounds like a bit of a contradiction; but the point that we’re trying to make is that, while it’s obviously tremendously important to bring your fans to Spotify, especially if it’s your main platform, you also can’t allow Spotify to turn into your sole online presence. Really, no business can survive on a single online platform in this day and age.

In other words, even as your numbers on Spotify continue to grow and flourish, you can’t allow yourself to let your other online presences become ghost towns. Keep your social media platforms alive – continue to engage with fans and followers, and post updates that’ll draw new followers. Keep your official website or blog updated, and ensure that you continue to keep fans updated through means other than Spotify. After all, as we’re probably making pretty clear here, these online platforms are key stepping stones in bringing new streams to your Spotify profile.

5.      Bring Spotify to your other online spaces

Thanks to the many wonders of the modern online world, it’s not inherently necessary for your fans to actually be on Spotify to push up your streaming numbers.

That’s why it’s so important to take full advantage of any following you may have in other spaces on the internet to grow your Spotify following. And while putting up links to your Spotify songs on other social media platforms is all well and good, it doesn’t compare with the effectiveness of the Spotify play button.

You might have heard of this one. In essence, this nifty little button allows users to stream and listen to your Spotify tracks via other sites. When placed on your website or blog, it makes for a seriously slick means of encouraging established fans, or potential new fans, to enjoy your work and push up your Spotify numbers in a manner highly convenient for everyone.

6.      Have a consistent tone

This could be said to apply to more or less any form of marketing, of course; but some folks fail to see how especially important it is when it comes to bringing music to a widespread audience.

Basically, when you promote your Spotify profile, and your music in general, you’ve got to be sure that you have a brand. And a brand is so much more than a band name or a logo design; it’s a means by which fans and newcomers will identify you.

Decide what sort of tone and attitude you want yourself, as an artist, to be associated with.

And then, once that tone and branding is settled on, keep it consistent. When you promote your new Spotify tracks, when you engage with fans on social media, when you engage with advertisers and promoters, keep that tone and brand consistent. Music is a profoundly personal thing to many people, and the artists and creators they support become, in many cases, a major aspect of their personal identity. As a result, they wish to be assured that this identity is founded upon a solid basis, and one which they can feel confident that the artist will identify with as strongly as themselves.

Basically? If you want to keep getting those Spotify streams, you need to be sure that you market yourself in a consistent manner that allows your brand, and your fans, to form a genuine identity. It’s more than a means of getting attention; it’s one of the key ways to build a loyal and consistent fanbase.

7.      Get noticed by folks with clout

As much as fans will enjoy getting your personal updates about all your latest Spotify releases and whatnot, it’s a slightly limiting approach in many ways.

In other words, if you really want to keep your Spotify numbers up, it’s best to invest some time and effort in getting your work on the radar of folks who specialise in promoting the work of musical artists – you know, musical journalists, bloggers, critics, and the like.

Oh, sure, promoters are great, too; but if you really want to pique the interest of potential new fans, it’s always best to get your Spotify work put forth by folks who don’t come across as if they’re getting paid or have a vested interest in getting your Spotify profile scene. This makes their promotion of your profile come across as far more genuine – and thus, it’s far more likely to bring in fresh fans.

Now, to be sure, actually getting the notice of these professional music bloggers or critics – especially the truly well-established ones – is pretty tricky. Upcoming Spotify stars are really a dime a dozen to them; and you won’t get anywhere by simply spamming them with constant pleas to check out your new single.

No, what’s best is to encourage these folks to find your tracks in an organic manner. Invest some time in investigating their work and figuring out precisely how they find new artists – what their searching methods are, what sort of playlists they’re likely to check out, and the like – and work on getting your work into those spaces. Check out what sort of music individual bloggers and journalists enjoy, and be honest with yourself as to whether they seem likely to find your work – and, if they do, whether they’ll promote it in a flattering manner. Contrary to popular belief, there really can be such a thing as bad publicity, at least when it comes to the world of music.

Oh, and if at all possible, keep an eye out for bloggers and journalists who specialise in your specific style or genre of music. This enhances your chance of their noticing you, and of their followers becoming your fans, a great deal.

SpotifyShahzaib Hassan